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India’s waterman says Paris summit failed completely

The Times of India, Nagpur, 21st December 2015

 

 

Nagpur: It is because Laxmi has become much more important than Saraswati that our world is facing complex problems related to environment and climate change, believes waterman of India Rajendra Singh. After attending the recent climate summit at Paris, he feels that many redundant issues were given too much time and several important ones didn't come up at all during the convention. Contrary to popular belief, he also believes that India was unsuccessful at this meet.

 

Singh was in the city to inaugurate an exhibition on water conservation at Raman Science Center. Addressing the gathered school kids, he expressed surprise that so many of them were present on a Sunday morning. Sharing his experiences from around the globe, the waterman and 2015 Laureate of the Stockholm World Water Prize encouraged students to take up water conservation on the individual level.

 

"Like some countries have been made to pay war reparations, developed countries have been made to commit paying a sum of $100 billion per year by 2020 during the climate summits at Copenhagen in 2009 and at Cancun in 2010. They were freed of this compensation at Paris. This alone is enough to call it a failed summit," said Singh.

 

He added that India could have made a better contribution to the summit by discussing important policies, like those on water and forests. This, he said, would have provided some good examples to other countries while increasing the country's prestige.

 

"In the next summit at Morocco, I would like the Indian delegation to talk about policies like Jalyukta Shivar and some of our model river rejuvenation plans. There are plenty of good examples, like those in Ralegaon Siddhi and Narkhed in Maharashtra," said the waterman.

 

Singh said developing countries have policies that are more sensitive towards environment. "Take India for example. Traditionally, our culture has been built on the basis of respect of nature, the protection and conservation of the five elements being essential to our lifestyle. I agree that despite calling earth and river as mothers, we don't accord them much respect," he said, adding that "modern" western science doesn't give nature much thought.

 

In fact, he believes that most developed countries had reached disastrous stages by first harming nature, then experiencing it's wrath and finally spending big bucks on undoing those harms. "At this juncture, it becomes even more important for the world to learn a thing or two from traditional societies like India about ecological balance. Sadly, the opposite is happening, with traditional societies giving up their way of living in favour of the modern way of life," said Singh.

 

A silver lining to this dark cloud, according to him, is that youngsters today are more sensitive to nature, giving him a hope that the future is not be all that bad.

 

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/Indias-waterman-says-Paris-summit-failed-completely/articleshow/50260076.cms The general prefernce for diesel vehicles is turning the air in Gujarat's cities toxic. In Gujarat today, around 1.21 crore vehicles, including two-wheelers, guzzle 18 crore litres of petrol a month. In stark contrast, just 24.06 lakh diesel vehicles burn a whopping 50 crore litres of the fuel which is almost three times the amount of petrol used! The exhaust of cars, buses and trucks using diesel ontain fine particles that stay suspended in the air for a long period of time. These particulate matter enter our lungs with the air we breathe. The smaller the par ticle the more dangerous it is.
The respirable particulate matter-they are from The respirable particulate matter-they are from 10 microns to 2.5 microns in size (PM10 to PM2.5) cause cancer and heart disease. Particulate matter of PM2.5 size can enter our blood streams and travel to other parts of the body affecting their functioning adversely . functioning adversely.

Ahmedabad, which uses almost 2.5 crore litres of diesel a month -the highest in the state --was rated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the 10th most polluted city in the world with a PM 2.5-level exceeding 100 microgram per cubic metre. The permissible limit for PM2.5 is just 60 micrograms per cubic meter.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/photo/50252801.cms
The Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell (PPAC) of the Union Ministry of Petroleum And Natural Gas had claimed in 2013 that even the latest Bharat Stage (BS) IV compliant diesel cars emit 25 gm of PM 2.5 particulates for every 1,000 km they travel. This is seven times more PM 2.5 emission than cars using petrol.

Further, diesel cars emit thrice the amount of nitrogen oxides than petrol driven vehicles. One can imagine what damage the 3.07 lakh diesel vehicles on Ahmedabad roads must have done to the purity of the city's air! On December 14, Ahmedabad's Maninagar area recorded PM 2.5 levels of 184 microgram per cubic meter during peak hours. This is not only almost three times the permitted limit but even higher than Beijing. The Chinese capital had recorded a PM2.5 concentration of 139.microgramm³ on December 10. In the case of PM10-the particulate matter that causes diseases in the upper respiratory tract--Surat and Vadodara have exceeded the permitted limit. It is alarming that Rajkot has not been measuring ambient air pollution since April this year! One may ask why don't diesel vehicles, particularly buses and trucks, switch to CNG when both fuels cost almost the same. (In Ahmedabad, diesel is priced at Rs 49.48 a litre while a kilo of CNG costs Rs 46.75.) Sources in the urban development department said the reason CNG buses are not prefered is they have higher operation and maintenance cost.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/photo/50252792.cms

GPCB member secretary Hardik Shah said thousands of trucks from all over the country enter Gujarat cities during the night. "Some are BSII compliant, some BSIII while some are even older. They contribute a lot to the city's air pollution," said Shah. Director general of Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), Sunita Narain, told TOI that, in 2004, the Supreme Court-appointed Bhure Lal committee had pushed for CNG and strengthening of public transport in Ahmedabad and other Gujarat cities.

"Unless that happens, Gujarat cities will continue to turn into gas chambers. Diesel vehicles will only make the situation worse," she said. Founder of Centre for Environment Education (CEE) Kartikeya Sarabhai told TOI that the focus should be on reducing traffic densities."Today I see diesel driven SUVs and cars with just one passenger. That's the real problem. The government should promote public transport that uses cleaner fuels," said Sarabhai. The general prefernce for diesel vehicles is turning the air in Gujarat's cities toxic. In Gujarat today, around 1.21 crore vehicles, including two-wheelers, guzzle 18 crore litres of petrol a month. In stark contrast, just 24.06 lakh diesel vehicles burn a whopping 50 crore litres of the fuel which is almost three times the amount of petrol used! The exhaust of cars, buses and trucks using diesel ontain fine particles that stay suspended in the air for a long period of time. These particulate matter enter our lungs with the air we breathe. The smaller the par ticle the more dangerous it is.
The respirable particulate matter-they are from The respirable particulate matter-they are from 10 microns to 2.5 microns in size (PM10 to PM2.5) cause cancer and heart disease. Particulate matter of PM2.5 size can enter our blood streams and travel to other parts of the body affecting their functioning adversely . functioning adversely.

Ahmedabad, which uses almost 2.5 crore litres of diesel a month -the highest in the state --was rated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the 10th most polluted city in the world with a PM 2.5-level exceeding 100 microgram per cubic metre. The permissible limit for PM2.5 is just 60 micrograms per cubic meter.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/photo/50252801.cms
The Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell (PPAC) of the Union Ministry of Petroleum And Natural Gas had claimed in 2013 that even the latest Bharat Stage (BS) IV compliant diesel cars emit 25 gm of PM 2.5 particulates for every 1,000 km they travel. This is seven times more PM 2.5 emission than cars using petrol.

Further, diesel cars emit thrice the amount of nitrogen oxides than petrol driven vehicles. One can imagine what damage the 3.07 lakh diesel vehicles on Ahmedabad roads must have done to the purity of the city's air! On December 14, Ahmedabad's Maninagar area recorded PM 2.5 levels of 184 microgram per cubic meter during peak hours. This is not only almost three times the permitted limit but even higher than Beijing. The Chinese capital had recorded a PM2.5 concentration of 139.microgramm³ on December 10. In the case of PM10-the particulate matter that causes diseases in the upper respiratory tract--Surat and Vadodara have exceeded the permitted limit. It is alarming that Rajkot has not been measuring ambient air pollution since April this year! One may ask why don't diesel vehicles, particularly buses and trucks, switch to CNG when both fuels cost almost the same. (In Ahmedabad, diesel is priced at Rs 49.48 a litre while a kilo of CNG costs Rs 46.75.) Sources in the urban development department said the reason CNG buses are not prefered is they have higher operation and maintenance cost.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/photo/50252792.cms

GPCB member secretary Hardik Shah said thousands of trucks from all over the country enter Gujarat cities during the night. "Some are BSII compliant, some BSIII while some are even older. They contribute a lot to the city's air pollution," said Shah. Director general of Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), Sunita Narain, told TOI that, in 2004, the Supreme Court-appointed Bhure Lal committee had pushed for CNG and strengthening of public transport in Ahmedabad and other Gujarat cities.

"Unless that happens, Gujarat cities will continue to turn into gas chambers. Diesel vehicles will only make the situation worse," she said. Founder of Centre for Environment Education (CEE) Kartikeya Sarabhai told TOI that the focus should be on reducing traffic densities."Today I see diesel driven SUVs and cars with just one passenger. That's the real problem. The government should promote public transport that uses cleaner fuels," said Sarabhai.